Why Christian Abuse Victims Retain Their Faith

John 17:14-15, I have given them your word, and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, just as I am not of the world. (15) I do not ask that you take them out of the world, but that you keep them from the evil one.

The 17th chapter of John’s Gospel is known as The High Priestly Prayer of Christ.  This actually is most properly called “The Lord’s Prayer” because it is His prayer.  We have been given the incredible privilege of hearing The Son pray to The Father.  We don’t appreciate what that means right now – one day we will.

Even more incredible is that the content of this prayer is offered by Christ for us, His people.  As our High Priest, Jesus prayed for us (and continues to do so as our Intercessor).  This prayer is a perfect prayer, completely conforming to the will of the Father.  Therefore, this prayer is an answered prayer.  All that the Son requests has been, is being, or will be brought about.

Why haven’t all of you who are victims of abuse, renounced Christ a long time ago?

Continue reading “Why Christian Abuse Victims Retain Their Faith”

Nets, Fish, and the New Creation

John 21:1-11 After this Jesus revealed himself again to the disciples by the Sea of Tiberias, and he revealed himself in this way. (2) Simon Peter, Thomas (called the Twin), Nathanael of Cana in Galilee, the sons of Zebedee, and two others of his disciples were together. (3) Simon Peter said to them, “I am going fishing.” They said to him, “We will go with you.” They went out and got into the boat, but that night they caught nothing. (4) Just as day was breaking, Jesus stood on the shore; yet the disciples did not know that it was Jesus. (5) Jesus said to them, “Children, do you have any fish?” They answered him, “No.” (6) He said to them, “Cast the net on the right side of the boat, and you will find some.” So they cast it, and now they were not able to haul it in, because of the quantity of fish. (7) That disciple whom Jesus loved therefore said to Peter, “It is the Lord!” When Simon Peter heard that it was the Lord, he put on his outer garment, for he was stripped for work, and threw himself into the sea. (8) The other disciples came in the boat, dragging the net full of fish, for they were not far from the land, but about a hundred yards off. (9) When they got out on land, they saw a charcoal fire in place, with fish laid out on it, and bread. (10) Jesus said to them, “Bring some of the fish that you have just caught.” (11) So Simon Peter went aboard and hauled the net ashore, full of large fish, 153 of them. And although there were so many, the net was not torn.

As we work in this ministry to expose evil, specifically the evil of abuse, we should also take some “time-outs” as Jesus did.  He would go off by Himself and talk with His Father, and that is not a bad thing for us to do as well.  In fact, it is a necessity.

As evil as these days are, the Christian is a person of hope.  Not just the “cross your fingers” kind of hope, but genuine hope of a real certainty.  Christ has conquered sin and death.  He has already initiated the New Creation in us.  Our redemption draws closer and closer.  On that Day, we will never know abuse nor the abuser again.

Continue reading “Nets, Fish, and the New Creation”

New Online Resource for Finding a Trauma/PTSD Therapist

One of our readers provided the following link to a web page where qualified therapists are listed in every state who are experienced in trauma and PTSD. Here it is:

Find a Therapist

Now obviously we cannot personally recommend every therapist listed at this site – we don’t know them. However, our friend did utilize this resource with a very good outcome and encouraged us to post it here.

I am no expert on looking for a counselor/therapist, but I think I can offer some advice:

  1. Secular counseling is not wrong or sinful. Many victims are told that secular counseling is sinful, shows a lack of faith, or will always be contrary to scripture. That is not true.
  2. A person does not have to go to a counselor required/recommended by their church leadership.  (We hear more and more how churches are telling victims where they have to go for counseling). In many cases you would end up being directed to a bad counselor.
  3. Beware (we must say this unfortunately) of so-called “biblical” counselors. Someone whose training is only from a relatively brief Christian counseling organization is simply not qualified and will very probably give you bogus and harmful information.
  4. Ask specifically what qualifications the person has to practice in cases of domestic abuse survivors, trauma, PTSD and so on. You don’t go to a general family physician when you need a specialist.
  5. If you don’t feel comfortable with the person, keep looking.
  6. Run if they ever try to approach your case with couple’s counseling (if you are not yet free of your abuser)
  7. In conjunction with the therapy, you will probably be helped by reading through Judith Herman’s book on Trauma.