The Abusive Man as a Servant of Righteousness — Sermon by Ps Jeff Crippen

The Abusive Man as a Servant of Righteousness – Exposing the Deceptions of Abuse
A 21 sermon series on domestic violence and abuse
First given on September 19, 2010
Sermon Text: 2 Corinthians 11:1-21

In the years leading up to WWII, Adolf Hitler came to be viewed as a kind of savior of the German people. In fact, he was one of the greatest abusers and users of people in all history. But during the era of his popularity, the large portion of the German people served him and even loved him. They thought him a kind of servant of righteousness. Unless, of course, you happened to be a Jew. Most people ignored the reports that Jews were being slaughtered. They were deceived and, to one degree or another, we might say they preferred to be deceived. It was more comfortable than the truth.

And so it is today. Our enemy is, as he has always been, a masterful liar. He is master of the disguise. And one of his favorite disguises is that of an angel of light, a servant of righteousness. A wolf, in other words, dressed up as a sheep.

Continue reading “The Abusive Man as a Servant of Righteousness — Sermon by Ps Jeff Crippen”

Scriptures — A New Tab on the Top Menu Bar of Unholy Charade

We have compiled a list of articles, each written by Pastor Crippen, which address various scriptures that abusers and church leaders often twist and then use against domestic abuse victims.  Each article looks at one Scripture by showing how that Scripture is often twisted and then bringing to light its biblical truth.

In addition to the articles we have listed a few sermons by Pastor Crippen that look at twisted Scriptures.  Links to the audio and PDFs of these sermons are provided.

These articles and sermons can be found on the top menu bar under the new tab: Scriptures

The Burden for Repentance Rests on the Wicked, Not on their Victims

1Pe 3:10-12 For “Whoever desires to love life and see good days, let him keep his tongue from evil and his lips from speaking deceit; (11) let him turn away from evil and do good; let him seek peace and pursue it. (12) For the eyes of the Lord are on the righteous, and his ears are open to their prayer. But the face of the Lord is against those who do evil.”

Who is responsible for repentance? The person who sins. The guilty. Innocent people do not need to “turn from their evil deeds.”

And yet this “repentance of the innocents” is precisely what we see taught so often in our churches today. Let me illustrate.

Continue reading “The Burden for Repentance Rests on the Wicked, Not on their Victims”